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Flavonoids Protect Against Major Killers

Citrus, Berries, Broccoli Reduce Risk of Cancer and CVD

Consuming flavonoids, a large class of nutrients found in plant foods, may reduce the risk for cancer and cardiovascular death, according to a study published in Nature Communications.

Researchers used data on 56,048 Danes, following their diet and health prospectively for 23 years. During that time, 14,083 people died.

After controlling for smoking, hypertension, cholesterol and many other health and dietary factors, the researchers found that, compared with people in the lowest one-fifth for flavonoid intake, those in the highest one-fifth had a 17% reduced risk for all-cause mortality, a 15% reduced risk for cardiovascular disease death, and a 20% reduced risk for cancer mortality. The association peaked at about 500 milligrams of flavonoids a day, and was stronger for smokers, heavy drinkers, and the obese.

Good sources of flavonoids include tea, chocolate, red wine, citrus fruits, berries, apples, and broccoli. One cup of tea, one apple, one orange, and three-and-a-half ounces each of blueberries and broccoli would supply more than 500 milligrams of total flavonoids.

Source: New York Times, Aug. 19, 2019

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