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Enzalutamide Improves Survival in Men With Metastatic Prostate Cancer

ASCO Results Exceed Researchers’ Expectations

Enzalutamide, an oral androgen receptor inhibitor, can improve outcomes for men with metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer (mHSPC), according to a study presented at the 2019 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Meeting.

Interim data from ENZAMET, an international randomized, phase 3 trial, demonstrate that mHSPC patients who received enzalutamide with testosterone suppression survived longer overall than patients who received standard of care (80% vs. 72%).

The improved cancer control and longer survival is relevant for patients with a high burden of disease––multiple bone metastases or liver metastases––and patients with a lower burden of disease. The new treatment is particularly appropriate for men who cannot tolerate chemotherapy and who have a lower burden of disease.

Early analysis suggests that in men with a lower burden of metastatic disease receiving testosterone suppression, enzalutamide may be more beneficial than docetaxel, although further investigation is needed. Combining testosterone suppression with both enzalutamide and docetaxel delayed time to disease progression, but it remains to be seen whether this triplet combination also improves quality of life and overall survival.

Known side effects associated with enzalutamide were observed in trial participants and caused a modest increase in adverse events compared to participants receiving one of the standard non-steroidal anti-androgens.

According to the National Cancer Institute, approximately 175,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and 32,000 men will die from the disease this year in the U.S.

Source: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, June 2, 2019

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