You are here

Alarming Rise in Antibiotic-Resistant UTIs in U.S.

E. Coli Affects More Patients Outside the Hospital

Drug-resistant bacteria caused nearly 6 percent of urinary tract infections (UTIs) studied by a California emergency department, a new study reports.

The bacteria were resistant to a majority of commonly used antibiotics and many of the patients had no identifiable risk factors for this kind of infection.

Most of the bacteria were E. coli that were resistant to cephalosporin antibiotics. E. coli has long caused infections in hospital patients, but it is now sickening more people outside the hospital, particularly with UTIs, researchers said.

Forty-four percent of the 1,754 UTIs studied were contracted outside a hospital, the highest rate ever reported in the United States, according to the study, which was published recently in Annals of Emergency Medicine.

Each year, about 23,000 Americans die from antibiotic-resistant infections, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Source: USNews.com, August 28, 2018

Recent Headlines

Potential contamination could lead to supply chain disruptions
Despite older, sicker patients, mortality rate fell by a third in 10 years
Study finds fewer than half of trials followed the law
WHO to meet tomorrow to decide on international public heath emergency declaration
Study of posted prices finds wild variations and missing data
Declining lung cancer mortality helped fuel the progress
Kinase inhibitor targets tumors with a PDGFRA exon 18 mutation
Delayed surgery reduces benefits; premature surgery raises risks
Mortality nearly doubled when patients stopped using their drugs