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Alarming Rise in Antibiotic-Resistant UTIs in U.S.

E. Coli Affects More Patients Outside the Hospital

Drug-resistant bacteria caused nearly 6 percent of urinary tract infections (UTIs) studied by a California emergency department, a new study reports.

The bacteria were resistant to a majority of commonly used antibiotics and many of the patients had no identifiable risk factors for this kind of infection.

Most of the bacteria were E. coli that were resistant to cephalosporin antibiotics. E. coli has long caused infections in hospital patients, but it is now sickening more people outside the hospital, particularly with UTIs, researchers said.

Forty-four percent of the 1,754 UTIs studied were contracted outside a hospital, the highest rate ever reported in the United States, according to the study, which was published recently in Annals of Emergency Medicine.

Each year, about 23,000 Americans die from antibiotic-resistant infections, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Source: USNews.com, August 28, 2018

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