You are here

Quality of Hospice Care for Blacks, Hispanics Seems To Come Up Short

Emotional and religious support may be lacking

Blacks and Hispanics are more likely to get care at poorer-quality hospitals than whites and, as a result, they do not have the same access to quality hospice care, according to a study in the July issue of Health Affairs. The study, conducted by Rand researchers, also found that blacks and Hispanics were less likely to get adequate emotional and religious support.

Rand researchers surveyed caregivers between April 2015 and March 2016. The caregivers had family members or friends who died while getting treated at nearly 2,500 hospices across the country.

Rebecca Anhang Price, a senior policy researcher at the Rand who was the study’s lead author, told HealthDay: “Our findings highlight the need to ensure that blacks and Hispanics have access to high-quality and culturally competent hospice services.” She said the study underscores the importance of publishing quality rankings of hospice care available to patients.

“A growing number of Americans are using hospice care in an attempt to die with dignity and in peace,” HealthDay added. “For example, almost half of Medicare enrollees who died in 2014 received hospice services, compared with fewer than one-quarter in 2000, the researchers said in background notes.”

Sources: Health Affairs; July 2017; HealthDay; July 5, 2017.

More Headlines

9-year-old treated for 40 weeks in infancy is the third such reported case
Researchers suggest FDA regulation of yohimbe and energy products
Patients who discontinue statins increase their risk for death, heart attack, or stroke
A 5% drop would cause annual measles cases to triple, according to study
Declining cases of infection and limitations of the blood test prompt revision
Renflexis also costs 20% less than a biosimilar already on the market
Government, industry, and advocacy groups collaborate on Expanded Access Navigator
Designed for NICUs, system negates moving babies within the hospital
Seeking to limit spread of infections, FDA clears improved device and manual