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Liver Transplantation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in HIV-Infected Patients

HIV Infection Does Not Adversely Affect Outcomes (May 10)

Liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is feasible for HIV-infected patients, with no differences in post-transplant survival or HCC recurrence rates compared with liver transplantation for HCC in HIV-uninfected patients. The study, published in The Oncologist, was led by Dr. Fabrizio Di Benedetto, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Surgery, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy, and represents the largest multicenter study of liver transplant for HCC in HIV-infected patients to date.

Patients infected with HIV experience a more aggressive course of HCC, in part due to the tumor-enhancing effects of HIV proteins, including increased growth signaling and diminished antitumor immune response. Moreover, as highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) prolongs the life expectancy of HIV-infected patients, the progression of underlying liver disease toward HCC is increasingly a major cause of morbidity and mortality in this patient population. Liver transplantation for HCC in HIV-infected patients is a recent indication, and its viability as a treatment option has been a matter of debate.

In the current study, researchers evaluated post-transplant outcomes in 30 HIV-positive patients and 125 HIV-uninfected patients who underwent liver transplantation for HCC at three transplantation centers in northern Italy between 2004 and 2009. Two patients in the HIV-positive cohort (6.7%) and 18 uninfected patients (14.4%) experienced a recurrence of HCC during the follow-up period of approximately 32 months (p = .15). Overall survival was similar for HIV-infected and -uninfected patients at 1 year (77% vs. 86.4%) and 3 years (65% vs. 70%), respectively, after liver transplantation (p = .32).

“The key message of this study is that liver transplantation is a valid option for HCC treatment in HIV-infected patients,” Dr. Di Benedetto and colleagues wrote. “We suggest that HIV-infected patients must be offered the same liver transplant options for HCC treatment currently provided to HIV-uninfected subjects.”

All HIV-infected patients were given HAART until liver transplantation, and antiviral therapy was discontinued only until liver function stabilized. No patients developed AIDS-defining events during the follow-up period, which the study authors attributed to early HAART resumption following transplantation. In particular, ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor (PI) therapy appeared to induce more rapid increases in immunosuppressive drug serum levels than unboosted PI therapy, and is the preferred HAART regimen.

In the future, new options for antiviral therapy may further improve HIV control and post-transplantation outcomes in HIV-infected patients undergoing liver transplantation for HCC.??The transplantation centers used a multidisciplinary approach to patient care that included input from oncologists, radiologists, gastroenterologists, liver surgeons, and infectious disease specialists. Dr. Di Benedetto and colleagues urged clinicians to adopt a similar collaborative approach to optimize outcomes for HIV-infected patients undergoing liver transplantation for HCC.

Source: The Oncologist

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