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Approvable Letter for Thalomid Issued

WARREN, N.J., Oct. 22 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Celgene Corporation (Nasdaq: CELG - News) -- announced that the Company received an approvable letter from the FDA for its THALOMID multiple myeloma sNDA late this afternoon.

The FDA letter stated that sufficient support for an accelerated approval could be provided by the results of the completed study E1A100, a large randomized Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) study comparing thalidomide plus dexamethasone to dexamethasone alone in previously untreated multiple myeloma patients.

The Company expects that submission of this additional data and completion of required responses and its review by the FDA could result in an accelerated approval of THALOMID as a treatment for multiple myeloma in approximately six to nine months.

About multiple myeloma
Multiple myeloma (also known as myeloma or plasma cell myeloma) is a cancer of the blood in which malignant plasma cells are overproduced in the bone marrow. Plasma cells are white blood cells that help produce antibodies called immunoglobulins that fight infection and disease. However, most patients with multiple myeloma have cells that produce a form of immunoglobulin called paraprotein (or M protein) that does not benefit the body. In addition, the malignant plasma cells replace normal plasma cells and other white blood cells important to the immune system. Multiple myeloma cells can also attach to other tissues of the body, such as bone, and produce tumors. The cause of the disease is unknown. Multiple myeloma is the second most common cancer of the blood, representing approximately one percent of all cancers and two percent of all cancer deaths with a worldwide prevalence of approximately 200,000 cases. In the year 2002, there were an estimated 74,000 new cases of multiple myeloma worldwide. The estimated number of deaths from multiple myeloma in 2002 was 57,370 worldwide.

Safety Notice
If thalidomide is taken during pregnancy, it can cause severe birth defects or death to an unborn baby. Thalidomide should never be used by women who are pregnant or who could become pregnant while taking the drug. Even a single dose, one capsule (50 mg, 100 mg and 200 mg), taken by a pregnant woman can cause severe birth defects. Because thalidomide is present in the semen of male patients, males receiving thalidomide must always use a latex condom during sexual contact with women of childbearing potential even if he has undergone a successful vasectomy. Thalidomide can only be marketed under a special restricted distribution program. This program is called the "System for Thalidomide Education and Prescribing Safety (S.T.E.P.S.®). Under this program, only registered prescribers and pharmacists may dispense the drug. In addition, patients must be advised of, agree to and comply with the requirements of S.T.E.P.S.

Thalidomide is known to cause nerve damage that may be permanent. Peripheral neuropathy is a common, potentially severe, side effect of treatment with thalidomide that may be irreversible. Decreased white blood cell counts, including neutropenia, have been reported in the clinical use of thalidomide. In placebo controlled clinical trials of HIV-seropositive patient populations, there have been reports of increased plasma HIV RNA levels associated with thalidomide therapy. The most common adverse events observed in clinical use in ENL and HIV-seropositive patient populations are rash, maculo-papular rash, drowsiness/somnolence, peripheral neuropathy, dizziness/orthostatic hypotension, neutropenia, and increased HIV-viral load. Patients should be advised about these associated adverse events and routinely monitored by a physician during treatment with thalidomide.

About THALOMID
THALOMID (thalidomide), developed and manufactured by Celgene Corporation, received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance on July 16, 1998 for the acute treatment of cutaneous manifestations of moderate to severe erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL) and as maintenance therapy for prevention and suppression of the cutaneous manifestations of ENL recurrence. THALOMID is not indicated as monotherapy for ENL treatment in the presence of moderate to severe neuritis.

Source: Celgene

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