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Positive Results from Largest ENB Study to Aid in Lung Cancer Diagnosis, Staging, Treatment

Key Finding Shows 65% of Patients Diagnosed With Early-Stage Lung Cancer

The Journal of Thoracic Oncology has published results from NAVIGATE, the largest, prospective, multicenter trial evaluating electromagnetic navigation bronchoscopy (ENB) procedures using the superDimensionTM navigation system to aid in lung cancer diagnosis, staging, and treatment. The results show the 12-month follow up for 1,215 patients at 29 medical centers in the United States.

The study demonstrated that clinicians can safely obtain a diagnosis in small, peripheral lung lesions, then stage the disease and prepare for future treatment with a single minimally invasive procedure. 

ENB procedures enable access hard-to-reach areas of the lung, which can aid in the diagnosis of lung disease and potentially lead to earlier, individualized treatment. Earlier treatment has been associated with improved survival.

The ENB procedure in NAVIGATE was successfully completed in 94% of patients and a diagnosis was obtained in 73% percent of patients. One key finding was that 65% of patients diagnosed with primary lung cancer were at early stages of the disease. The procedure had lower complication rates than those for transthoracic needle biopsies. Pneumothorax (collapsed lung caused by injury to the lung wall) occurred in only 4.3% of study NAVIGATE patients versus the 19%–25% rates that are usually seen with transthoracic needle biopsies.

Source: Medtronic, January 30, 2019

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