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New Data for Liraglutide (Victoza) in Diabetic Patients

Hemoglobin target reached more often versus comparators (Nov. 27)

In new data analyses, more patients with type 2 diabetes achieved hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) target levels of less than 7.0% with liraglutide (Victoza, Novo Nordisk) after 12, 20, and 26 weeks of treatment than with twice-daily sitagliptin (Januvia, Merck) or exenatide (Byetta, Amlyn Pharmaceuticals). The analyses showed that:

  • Patients treated with liraglutide 1.2 mg had a significantly higher estimated chance of reaching the HbA1c target of less than 7.0% (1.76 times more likely) across the 26-week treatment period than had those treated with sitagliptin (P < 0.0030).
  • Patients treated with liraglutide 1.8 mg were estimated to be 2.1 times more likely to reach the HbA1c target of less than 7.0% across the 26-week treatment period than were those treated with sitagliptin (P < 0.0001).
  • Patients treated with liraglutide 1.8 mg had a significantly higher estimated chance of reaching the HbA1c target of less than 7.0% (1.5 times more likely) across the 26-week treatment period than had those treated with exenatide (P < 0.0068).

The new data were presented on November 27 at the 9th Annual International Diabetes Federation Western Pacific Region congress in Kyoto, Japan.

Another analysis, presented on the same day, demonstrated that, in type 2 diabetes patients treated with add-on metformin with baseline HbA1c of less than 8%, significantly more patients treated with liraglutide 1.8 mg reached the HbA1c target of less than 7% compared with patients treated with twice-daily exenatide (84% vs. 61.5%, respectively; P = 0.03) or sitagliptin (77.6% vs. 36.7%, respectively; P < 0.0001) over a 26-week period. Improving blood sugar control, even in patients who are close to their blood sugar target, can help reduce the risk of complications associated with diabetes.

Liraglutide is a human glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue with an amino acid sequence that is 97% similar to that of endogenous human GLP-1. Like natural GLP-1, liraglutide works by stimulating beta cells to release insulin and by suppressing glucagon secretion from alpha cells only when blood sugar levels are high. Because of this glucose-dependent mechanism of action, liraglutide is associated with a low rate of hypoglycemia. The mechanism of blood-sugar lowering also involves a delay in gastric emptying.

Source: Novo Nordisk; November 27, 2012.

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